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Adjunctive minocycline treatment for major depressive disorder: A proof of concept trial

Overview of attention for article published in Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 1,532)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
Title
Adjunctive minocycline treatment for major depressive disorder: A proof of concept trial
Published in
Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, June 2017
DOI 10.1177/0004867417709357
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dean, Olivia M, Kanchanatawan, Buranee, Ashton, Melanie, Mohebbi, Mohammadreza, Ng, Chee Hong, Maes, Michael, Berk, Lesley, Sughondhabirom, Atapol, Tangwongchai, Sookjaroen, Singh, Ajeet B, McKenzie, Helen, Smith, Deidre J, Malhi, Gin S, Dowling, Nathan, Berk, Michael, Olivia M Dean, Buranee Kanchanatawan, Melanie Ashton, Mohammadreza Mohebbi, Chee Hong Ng, Michael Maes, Lesley Berk, Atapol Sughondhabirom, Sookjaroen Tangwongchai, Ajeet B Singh, Helen McKenzie, Deidre J Smith, Gin S Malhi, Nathan Dowling, Michael Berk

Abstract

Conventional antidepressant treatments result in symptom remission in 30% of those treated for major depressive disorder, raising the need for effective adjunctive therapies. Inflammation has an established role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder, and minocycline has been shown to modify the immune-inflammatory processes and also reduce oxidative stress and promote neuronal growth. This double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial examined adjunctive minocycline (200 mg/day, in addition to treatment as usual) for major depressive disorder. This double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial investigated 200 mg/day adjunctive minocycline (in addition to treatment as usual) for major depressive disorder. A total of 71 adults with major depressive disorder ( Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition) were randomised to this 12-week trial. Outcome measures included the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (primary outcome), Clinical Global Impression-Improvement and Clinical Global Impression-Severity, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire, Social and Occupational Functioning Scale and the Range of Impaired Functioning Tool. The study was registered on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register: www.anzctr.org.au , #ACTRN12612000283875. Based on mixed-methods repeated measures analysis of variance at week 12, there was no significant difference in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores between groups. However, there were significant differences, favouring the minocycline group at week 12 for Clinical Global Impression-Improvement score - effect size (95% confidence interval) = -0.62 [-1.8, -0.3], p = 0.02; Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire score - effect size (confidence interval) = -0.12 [0.0, 0.2], p < 0.001; and Social and Occupational Functioning Scale and the Range of Impaired Functioning Tool score - 0.79 [-4.5, -1.4], p < 0.001. These effects remained at follow-up (week 16), and Patient Global Impression also became significant, effect size (confidence interval) = 0.57 [-1.7, -0.4], p = 0.017. While the primary outcome was not significant, the improvements in other comprehensive clinical measures suggest that minocycline may be a useful adjunct to improve global experience, functioning and quality of life in people with major depressive disorder. Further studies are warranted to confirm the potential of this accessible agent to optimise treatment outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 23%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 15%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Other 4 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 54%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 8%
Unspecified 1 8%
Psychology 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 62. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 July 2017.
All research outputs
#148,416
of 8,328,508 outputs
Outputs from Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
#21
of 1,532 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,617
of 241,767 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
#2
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,328,508 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,532 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,767 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.