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Women’s employment patterns after childbirth and the perceived access to and use of flexitime and teleworking

Overview of attention for article published in Human Relations, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 1,375)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
33 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
policy
4 policy sources
twitter
92 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
79 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
350 Mendeley
Title
Women’s employment patterns after childbirth and the perceived access to and use of flexitime and teleworking
Published in
Human Relations, August 2017
DOI 10.1177/0018726717713828
Pubmed ID
Authors

Heejung Chung, Mariska van der Horst

Abstract

This article sets out to investigate how flexitime and teleworking can help women maintain their careers after childbirth. Despite the increased number of women in the labour market in the UK, many significantly reduce their working hours or leave the labour market altogether after childbirth. Based on border and boundary management theories, we expect flexitime and teleworking can help mothers stay employed and maintain their working hours. We explore the UK case, where the right to request flexible working has been expanded quickly as a way to address work-life balance issues. The dataset used is Understanding Society (2009-2014), a large household panel survey with data on flexible work. We find some suggestive evidence that flexible working can help women stay in employment after the birth of their first child. More evidence is found that mothers using flexitime and with access to teleworking are less likely to reduce their working hours after childbirth. This contributes to our understanding of flexible working not only as a tool for work-life balance, but also as a tool to enhance and maintain individuals' work capacities in periods of increased family demands. This has major implications for supporting mothers' careers and enhancing gender equality in the labour market.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 92 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 350 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 350 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 72 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 58 17%
Student > Bachelor 32 9%
Researcher 23 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 20 6%
Other 71 20%
Unknown 74 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Business, Management and Accounting 98 28%
Social Sciences 78 22%
Psychology 37 11%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 13 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 2%
Other 35 10%
Unknown 82 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 368. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 May 2022.
All research outputs
#60,225
of 21,217,760 outputs
Outputs from Human Relations
#3
of 1,375 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,765
of 291,193 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Relations
#1
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,217,760 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,375 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,193 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.