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A Multilab Preregistered Replication of the Ego-Depletion Effect

Overview of attention for article published in Perspectives on Psychological Science, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#22 of 1,152)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

dimensions_citation
667 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
908 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
A Multilab Preregistered Replication of the Ego-Depletion Effect
Published in
Perspectives on Psychological Science, July 2016
DOI 10.1177/1745691616652873
Pubmed ID
URN
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132383
Authors

M. S. Hagger, N. L. D. Chatzisarantis, H. Alberts, C. O. Anggono, C. Batailler, A. R. Birt, R. Brand, M. J. Brandt, G. Brewer, S. Bruyneel, D. P. Calvillo, W. K. Campbell, P. R. Cannon, M. Carlucci, N. P. Carruth, T. Cheung, A. Crowell, D. T. D. De Ridder, S. Dewitte, M. Elson, J. R. Evans, B. A. Fay, B. M. Fennis, A. Finley, Z. Francis, E. Heise, H. Hoemann, M. Inzlicht, S. L. Koole, L. Koppel, F. Kroese, F. Lange, K. Lau, B. P. Lynch, C. Martijn, H. Merckelbach, N. V. Mills, A. Michirev, A. Miyake, A. E. Mosser, M. Muise, D. Muller, M. Muzi, D. Nalis, R. Nurwanti, H. Otgaar, M. C. Philipp, P. Primoceri, K. Rentzsch, L. Ringos, C. Schlinkert, B. J. Schmeichel, S. F. Schoch, M. Schrama, A. Schütz, A. Stamos, G. Tinghög, J. Ullrich, M. vanDellen, S. Wimbarti, W. Wolff, C. Yusainy, O. Zerhouni, M. Zwienenberg

Abstract

Good self-control has been linked to adaptive outcomes such as better health, cohesive personal relationships, success in the workplace and at school, and less susceptibility to crime and addictions. In contrast, self-control failure is linked to maladaptive outcomes. Understanding the mechanisms by which self-control predicts behavior may assist in promoting better regulation and outcomes. A popular approach to understanding self-control is the strength or resource depletion model. Self-control is conceptualized as a limited resource that becomes depleted after a period of exertion resulting in self-control failure. The model has typically been tested using a sequential-task experimental paradigm, in which people completing an initial self-control task have reduced self-control capacity and poorer performance on a subsequent task, a state known as ego depletion Although a meta-analysis of ego-depletion experiments found a medium-sized effect, subsequent meta-analyses have questioned the size and existence of the effect and identified instances of possible bias. The analyses served as a catalyst for the current Registered Replication Report of the ego-depletion effect. Multiple laboratories (k = 23, total N = 2,141) conducted replications of a standardized ego-depletion protocol based on a sequential-task paradigm by Sripada et al. Meta-analysis of the studies revealed that the size of the ego-depletion effect was small with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) that encompassed zero (d = 0.04, 95% CI [-0.07, 0.15]. We discuss implications of the findings for the ego-depletion effect and the resource depletion model of self-control.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 149 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 908 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 7 <1%
United States 7 <1%
United Kingdom 4 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 885 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 187 21%
Student > Master 140 15%
Student > Bachelor 132 15%
Researcher 98 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 66 7%
Other 157 17%
Unknown 128 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 488 54%
Social Sciences 46 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 31 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 25 3%
Neuroscience 20 2%
Other 109 12%
Unknown 189 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 504. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2022.
All research outputs
#40,607
of 22,641,687 outputs
Outputs from Perspectives on Psychological Science
#22
of 1,152 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,001
of 364,803 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Perspectives on Psychological Science
#2
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,641,687 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,152 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 71.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 364,803 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.