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What can we learn from second generation digital natives? A qualitative study of undergraduates’ views of digital health at one London university

Overview of attention for article published in Digital Health, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#22 of 229)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
35 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
Title
What can we learn from second generation digital natives? A qualitative study of undergraduates’ views of digital health at one London university
Published in
Digital Health, July 2018
DOI 10.1177/2055207618788156
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aasha E Cowey, Henry W W Potts

Abstract

We live in a digital age and opportunities within healthcare are increasing, ranging from patient portals to wearable devices. Today's undergraduates are second generation digital natives and are at a critical point of becoming more autonomous in their healthcare interactions. This study aims to understand their experiences of both digital and broader healthcare. This will enable a better understanding of implications for national policy, individual healthcare organisations and further research. Undergraduates aged 18-21 participated in individual interviews or focus groups. Inductive thematic analysis was undertaken. Negative member checking and feedback on emerging themes from both participants and experts were used to increase the validity of the study. Twenty-four undergraduates participated in the study, including a high proportion of international students. Thematic analysis revealed 16 themes. Six key themes explored in this paper are: generation gap; impact on healthcare professionals (HCPs); use of technology to replace or enhance HCP interactions; use of technology to support administration/transactional activities; paper vs electronic; and personally held health and fitness data. This paper highlights recommendations for the undergraduate cohort and wider populations including better articulation of benefits, making digital options more personalised and interactive, and raising awareness of dangerous 'obsessive' behaviour around health and fitness apps. Some of our findings challenge the assumption that this generation will automatically accept digital initiatives, including the importance this cohort continues to place on face-to-face interactions. In response, we offer some suggestions to improve awareness, utilisation and acceptance of digital health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 19%
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Researcher 2 7%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 22%
Arts and Humanities 2 7%
Social Sciences 2 7%
Engineering 2 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 4%
Other 7 26%
Unknown 7 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 30. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2020.
All research outputs
#697,911
of 15,692,207 outputs
Outputs from Digital Health
#22
of 229 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,101
of 278,354 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Digital Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,692,207 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 229 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,354 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them